Sunday, 21 June 2015

No Shuttle Damage: NCL Cruise Ship Wake Causes Minor Drama at Intrepid Museum

No Shuttle Damage: NCL Cruise Ship Wake Causes Minor Drama at Intrepid Museum


Updated at 10:58 AM with comment from the U. S. Coast Guard.
Updated at 10:29 AM with comment from Norwegian Cruise Lines.
The wake from a docking cruise ship in New York’s Hudson River jostled the retired submarine Growler at the Intrepid Museum, knocking its gangway into the water, according to Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Sara Romero.  The Norwegian Star, which can carry 2,348 passengers, was pulling into Pier 88 under the guidance of a New York harbor pilot on the bridge.  Norwegian Cruise Lines Public Relations Vice President AnneMarie Mathews  says propulsion and thrusters were used “which created a wake in surrounding waters.”

Norwegian Jewel pictured Not the Norwegian Star.
Describing it as a “minor incident,” Coast Guard Spokesperson Thomas McKenzie said that there were “no damages, no injuries, no collisions and no pollution released.”
There was no damage to the Space Shuttle recently put on display at the museum.
Earlier today @cbsnews reported that the Intrepid Museum was damaged in a ‘collision’ with a Norwegian Cruise Lines Ship.
Luke Sacks, at the Intrepid Museum, sent me this statement…
The initial finding is that a cruise ship thrusting its engines as it attempted to turn into its berth north of the Intrepid pier generated a strong wave that caused the retired submarine Growler to move. There were no injuries. A gangway to the Growler was damaged.  The Intrepid was not affected.
Anne Marie Mathews, Vice President of Public Relations at Norwegian Cruise Line says…
This morning at Pier 88 in New York City, Norwegian Star docked safely and securely without making contact with any other vessel or pier.
The ship was guided by a New York pilot who was on the bridge.  In the process of maneuvering to its docking position, the ship experienced strong current conditions. To keep the ship in its correct docking approach under these conditions, propulsion and thrusters were utilized which created a wake in the surrounding waters.